Maternity Leave (Statutory and Occupational)

Applicable to employees of the Central Academic Bodies and central activities of the University of London (the "central University") and University staff deployed to Health Education England.

1 Information for New and Expectant Mothers 
2 Information for Managers 
3 Risk Assessments

 

1 Information for New and Expectant Mothers

Our maternity leave guide will give you information about time off for ante-natal appointments and of the dates by which you need to inform us of your intention to take maternity leave, as well as information about your entitlements to pay and the duration of leave available to you and the treatment of paid annual leave during and after maternity leave.

As well as meeting the requirement to notify us of your intention to take maternity leave, the application and planning form  [PDF 4pgs, 31KB] will help you to assess your entitlements and to establish the key dates by which you need to notify us of your intention to take maternity leave, give notice of your return, and/or change the dates of your starting or returning from maternity leave.

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2 Information for Managers

Managers must be aware of their obligations in respect of their staff who are new or expectant mothers.  In particular, managers should be aware that staff are entitled to paid time off for ante-natal care and of the need to undertake a risk-assessment.

Please notify the Human Resources as soon as possible when you are notified by one of your staff that she is pregnant and, in the event that the employee gives birth to her baby prior to the expected commencement of her Maternity Leave, advise the Human Resources immediately.  (You should note that there is no distinction between the live birth of a child or a still birth after a pregnancy lasting at least 24 weeks in the granting of Maternity Leave).

 

3 Risk Assessments

The Management of Health and Safety at Work Regulations 1999 require that risk assessments relating to new and expectant mothers are undertaken.

Pregnancy is not an illness. It is part of everyday life and its health and safety implications can be adequately addressed by normal health and safety management procedures.

Being pregnant or a new mother should not prevent women from working and developing their career.  However, working conditions normally considered acceptable may no longer be so during pregnancy and while breastfeeding; and there are specific laws which require employers to protect the health and safety of their employees who are or in the future could be a new or expectant mother.

Pregnancy does not equate to ill health and the purpose of the assessment is to prevent risks to new or expectant mothers, and to the child, from work that would not usually present a risk. Click here for general guidance on risk assessments for new and expectant mothers [Word 5pgs, 47KB].

Additional guidance is available from the Health & Safety Exectutive here.

 

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Downloadable Version

Maternity [PDF 1pg, 183kb]