Emeka Anyaoku Chair in Commonwealth Studies

This Trust Fund is used to fund a Visiting Professorial Chair to research the Commonwealth at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies.   It is named after Chief Emeka Anyaoku, the third Commonwealth-Secretary General.  Chief Anyaoku is a graduate of the University of Ibadan, and attended when it was an external college of the University of London (then University College of Ibadan).

Australian Bicentennial Scholarships and Fellowships Trust

The Australian Bicentennial Trust was established in 1988 to commemorate 200 years since the establishment of the colony of New South Wales, the first colony on mainland of what later became Australia.  The Trust Fund was established with the support of the Australian Government and numerous donors, and in accordance with the official organisers of Australian bicentennial celebrations.  It was hoped that the Trust Fund would promote educational exchanges between the United Kingdom and Australia.

The Trust Fund is presently used to support Australian Bicentennial Scholarships and Fellowships at the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies, King’s College London.  The Scholarships and Fellowships enable UK postgraduate students or academic staff to undertake research and study in Australia for a minimum of 3 months.  The schemes are also open to Australian postgraduate students and academic staff wishing to come to the UK.

Central Research Fund

The Central Research Fund was created by the University to support postgraduate students and academic staff undertaking research.

Coffin Fund for Promising Students

In 1956, the University was informed of a sum of money left in the will of Mr A. C. Coffin.  The bequest had a number of elements to it and the University chose to split them up into individual trust funds.  The Coffin Fund for Promising Students was created to award “Prizes for outstandingly promising students in any department of the University.”

Coffin Institute of Education

In 1956, the University was informed of a sum of money left in the will of Mr A. C. Coffin.  The bequest had a number of elements to it and the University chose to split them up into individual trust funds.  One of aims of the bequest was to “provide for the printing of reports of educational progress by the Directors of the Institute of Education.

The money from the Trust Fund is still transferred over to the Institute of Education every year and is used to support the Publications Department.

Convocation Trust

Convocation, as the body of graduates of the University, was established by Charter of 1858 and flourished throughout the period when the central organs of the University were dominant. Over the years the officers and members of Convocation made a valuable contribution to the affairs of the University.

Following the restructuring of the University in 1994, in which many powers were decentralised to the Colleges, the Convocation began to make less sense, as graduates identified with their individual College alumni association.  In 2003 the Convocation in its original form was abolished.  However, the Convocation Trust, funded from the donations of former students, continued to exist.

The Convocation Trust continues to play an active role across the University of London federation.  The Trust is run by a small management committee made of up of external trustees and is a decision making body independent from the University’s central management.  The Trust’s remit remains the same as that of the previous Convocation association, which is for the benefit of all Federal University of London students.  Over recent years the Trust has funded academic prizes and scholarships across the colleges, and made numerous grants to areas of the University, including to the Senate House Library and University of London Union.
 
The Convocation Trust continues to receive donations and support from University of London graduates.

Drummond Fund

The Drummond Fund was established in 1942 following a donation from Lady Drummond.  The Trust Fund was created to support Connaught Hall, one of the University’s student halls of residence, and though no specific purpose was given, Lady Drummond proposed that it might be used to reward students who have achieved high examination grades.

Sir Banister Fletcher Bequest

The Sir Banister Fletcher Bequest was left to the University in 1953.  The Trust Fund’s purpose is to support the publication of new editions of Sir Banister’s book A History of Architecture.  In Sir Banister’s will, he named the University and RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) the joint holders of the copyright to the work and both institutions have worked together to publish many editions of the book ever since.

Sir Banister Fletcher was an architect and an architectural historian who trained at both King’s College London and University College London.  His book, A History of Architecture, is an important textbook in his subject area.

Sir Banister Fletcher Lectureship

The Sir Banister Fletcher Lectureship fund was set up in 1953, at the same time as the Banister Fletcher Bequest.  The money was given to the University in Sir Banister’s will and he asked that it be used to fund an academic chair in architecture.  Unfortunately the sum of money was not enough to fund such a post, so in 1979 the University created the Banister Fletcher Lectureship, which is based at the Bartlett School of Architecture (part of UCL).

ST Lee Visiting Professorship

The ST Visiting Professorship was created following the generous donation from Dr ST Lee of Singapore.  Lee Visiting Professors are short-term, with post-holders being based at one of the ten Institutes of the School of Advanced Study or the Human Rights Consortium, for between four and six weeks.  Previously the Professorships lasted for six months.  The Lee Professor undertakes research and engages in lectures and other media at the School of Advanced Study.

Details on the ST Lee Visiting Professorship can be found here

Neaveth Fund

The Neaveth Fund was established following a donation to the University in 1958 after a long and complicated saga which had begun two decades before.  The money from the fund had originated in Hungary but was moved to Britain in 1938 to avoid the influence of Nazism.  The donors requested that the donation be used to support Hungarian students at the University and were advised that Neaveth Scholarships would be the best way of achieving this.

In 2014 the Trust Funds Committee agreed that all University of London Colleges and the School of Advanced Study could seek assistance from this fund for Hungarian students.  To be eligible for Neaveth funding the students in question must have been deemed by their host College to qualify for financial assistance bursaries under the normal criteria.  For more information Colleges should contact trustfunds@london.ac.uk .  The University will not accept applications directly from students; students that think they may be eligible should contact their own department.

Publications Fund

The Publications Fund was established by the University in 1981 following the sale of the Athlone Press to a private company.  The fund’s objects were to support the publication of individual works of academic merit.  The first publication supported by the trust fund was Germany in the Later Middle Ages by Emeritus Professor F. R. H. du Boulay.

Tibawi Bequest

The Tibawi Bequest was established in commemoration of Dr Abdul Latif Tibawi, who left money to the University to establish a research fellowship in his name.  The Fellowship was support Palestinian Arab students, male or female and from any religion, whose family had been forced from their homeland between 1948 and 1949 or in 1967.  Dr Tibawi also requested that the Fellowship be for research into education, history or literature related to Palestine after 1850.
 
Due to the difficulty with carrying out these wishes fully and with the expressed permission of Dr Tibawi’s family, the University altered the terms of the trust, which now offers support to Palestinian Arab students at the School of African and Oriental Studies (SOAS).  The bequest has since been added to through further generous donations from Dr Tibawi’s family.

Ethel M. Wood Lecture

Following a generous donation, the Ethel M. Wood Lectures were established in the 1960s. The annual lecture or lectures could be on any aspect of the English Bible which is not theologically controversial, i.e., historical, geographical, archaeological, etc.  Ms Wood also later bequeathed her collection of rare American and English bibles to the Senate House Library and established a book fund.

The Ethel M. Wood Lectures are currently hosted by King’s College London, although they have also been hosted at Heythrop College.

University of London Prize Fund

The University of London Prize Fund was created out of the (now defunct) University of London Scholarship Fund.  The Scholarship Fund had traditionally been the place where donations to the University were sent when they were specifically for scholarships but with no particular area of the University In mind.  Previously when the central University had more control within the federation and a bigger administrative presence, students would apply directly for support from the fund. 

The University enlarged the Scholarship Fund three times during the 1990s and 2000s by, with the approval of Charity Commission, moving smaller funds that had become difficult to manage into the larger single fund.  Following the University of London Act (1994) when the Colleges became largely autonomous, the former method of administration had proved inadequate and the University was no longer able to spend income from funds which were too restrictive.

In 2011, with approval from the Charity Commission, the University split the Scholarship Fund into three smaller funds to better reflect the previous restrictions of the former individual trust funds; thus establishing the University of London Prize Fund.

The Prize Fund is apportioned between all the University of London Colleges and School of Advanced Study based on their student numbers.  It is used by each Institution to fund academic prizes in the name of any of the former prize funds.

University of London Research Fund

The University of London Research Fund was created out of the (now defunct) University of London Scholarship Fund.  The Scholarship Fund had traditionally been the place where donations to the University were sent when they were specifically for scholarships but with no particular area of the University In mind.  Previously when the central University had more control within the federation and a bigger administrative presence, students would apply directly for support from the fund. 

The University enlarged the Scholarship Fund three times during the 1990s and 2000s by, with the approval of Charity Commission, moving smaller funds that had become difficult to manage into the larger single fund.  Following the University of London Act (1994) when the Colleges became largely autonomous, the former method of administration had proved inadequate and the University was no longer able to spend income from funds which were too restrictive.

In 2011, with approval from the Charity Commission, the University split the Scholarship Fund into three smaller funds to better reflect the previous restrictions of the former individual trust funds; thus establishing the University of London Research Fund.

The Research Fund is apportioned between all the University of London Colleges and School of Advanced Study based on their student numbers.  It is up to each receiving institution to allocate the research funding as they think most appropriate in the name of any of the former research funds.

University of London Studentship Fund

The University of London Studentship Fund was created out of the (now defunct) University of London Scholarship Fund.  The Scholarship Fund had traditionally been the place where donations to the University were sent when they were specifically for scholarships but with no particular area of the University In mind.  Previously when the central University had more control within the federation and a bigger administrative presence, students would apply directly for support from the fund. 

The University enlarged the Scholarship Fund three times during the 1990s and 2000s by, with the approval of Charity Commission, moving smaller funds that had become difficult to manage into the larger single fund.  Following the University of London Act (1994) when the Colleges became largely autonomous, the former method of administration had proved inadequate and the University was no longer able to spend income from funds which were too restrictive.

In 2011, with approval from the Charity Commission, the University split the Scholarship Fund into three smaller funds to better reflect the previous restrictions of the former individual trust funds; thus establishing the University of London Studentship Fund.

The Studentship Fund is apportioned between all the University of London Colleges and School of Advanced Study based on their student numbers.  Each College is free to offer studentships in the name of any previous trust fund at any of their departments on the criteria they think most suitable.

For Trust Fund enquiries and applications:


Email:
 
Trustfunds@london.ac.uk 


Postal Address:

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University of London
Senate House
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